super caliente~
chicanafem:

spooky-louie:

almuertotodolesobra:

spooky-louie:

oh-beatriz:

this is the best to eat, especially when we don’t have enough money to eat anything else. Appreciate it yo

very tru

I’d still eat this even if I made bank tbh

still tru

The basics are the best

chicanafem:

spooky-louie:

almuertotodolesobra:

spooky-louie:

oh-beatriz:

this is the best to eat, especially when we don’t have enough money to eat anything else. Appreciate it yo

very tru

I’d still eat this even if I made bank tbh

still tru

The basics are the best

hot-like-mexico:

[rt’s at the speed of light]

[rt’s at the speed of light]

BECAUSE Mexican mass culture is antiblack and colourist as fuck (just look at telenovelas). So much so that Afromexicans in Mexico City are thought of as “costeños” and “just really dark” erasing of their African identity (this I know from growing up there) and mexican people whose indigenous features are more visible, continue to be discriminated. 
Whites/white-passing Mexicans are mainly middle/high class almost all of the time. Most of our barrios have been historically poor, where less-white looking Mexicans were relegated to. 
Basically same shit, different country

xicxbanda

Sing it child

(via dontbeabrat)

That’s why it’s so so important for us to talk and dismantle colorism and antiblackness!!!

(via princesswhatevr)

Anti black and native racism have always been a huge problem amongst Latinx, while white and white passing Latinx continue to be held as being the ‘idle’. It’s disgusting. We have to recognize these issues of colourism in our communities if we’re going to do better.

(via weareallmixedup)

theatlantic:

The Writing on Mexican Walls Isn’t Graffiti — It’s ‘Vernacular Branding’

In central Mexico, walls are invitations to party. Since 1960, bardas de baile (loosely translated as “music walls”) have illuminated exurban and rural areas with colorful, hand-painted advertisements for music, dances, and carnivals. Although these work of homemade graphic design share some of the characteristics of graffiti, they are not tags - and they are tolerated by the authorities. The new book Mexican Wall Painting: Bardas De Baile (Ghost & Co., New York) by Patricia Cué, a designer and design teacher at San Diego State University, examines these expressive painted letterings and the subcultures that have developed around them.
Read more. [Image: Ghost & Co.]

theatlantic:

The Writing on Mexican Walls Isn’t Graffiti — It’s ‘Vernacular Branding’

In central Mexico, walls are invitations to party. Since 1960, bardas de baile (loosely translated as “music walls”) have illuminated exurban and rural areas with colorful, hand-painted advertisements for music, dances, and carnivals. Although these work of homemade graphic design share some of the characteristics of graffiti, they are not tags - and they are tolerated by the authorities. The new book Mexican Wall Painting: Bardas De Baile (Ghost & Co., New York) by Patricia Cué, a designer and design teacher at San Diego State University, examines these expressive painted letterings and the subcultures that have developed around them.

Read more. [Image: Ghost & Co.]

withlookingglassties:

I just finished painting this patch!

withlookingglassties:

I just finished painting this patch!

me-la-pelas:

My heart still hurts over this great injustice

me-la-pelas:

My heart still hurts over this great injustice